who says

When I was younger it was popular for my leftie friends to ask “Why can’t we be like Western Europe?” We probably can. A good first step, it seems, would be fighting a genocidal war which results in massive relocations, more ethnic homogeneity, the near-extermination of one of our minorities (one guess at who that would be) and the reduction of our major cities to rubble.

Ta-Nehisi Coates, on war, welfare, and the aftermath of the Second World War. (via theatlantic)


rootsgrowdeeper:

This life.I cannot wait to share yosemite with you, to watch you experience this for the first time in your life, I cannot wait to share my sacred place with you. I can’t wait to climb half dome with you and stand at the top, holding you close, and whisper to you that this is the first place that I felt alive. Even at the age of 4 I knew it was a special place.2 more years. rootsgrowdeeper:

This life.I cannot wait to share yosemite with you, to watch you experience this for the first time in your life, I cannot wait to share my sacred place with you. I can’t wait to climb half dome with you and stand at the top, holding you close, and whisper to you that this is the first place that I felt alive. Even at the age of 4 I knew it was a special place.2 more years. rootsgrowdeeper:

This life.I cannot wait to share yosemite with you, to watch you experience this for the first time in your life, I cannot wait to share my sacred place with you. I can’t wait to climb half dome with you and stand at the top, holding you close, and whisper to you that this is the first place that I felt alive. Even at the age of 4 I knew it was a special place.2 more years. rootsgrowdeeper:

This life.I cannot wait to share yosemite with you, to watch you experience this for the first time in your life, I cannot wait to share my sacred place with you. I can’t wait to climb half dome with you and stand at the top, holding you close, and whisper to you that this is the first place that I felt alive. Even at the age of 4 I knew it was a special place.2 more years. rootsgrowdeeper:

This life.I cannot wait to share yosemite with you, to watch you experience this for the first time in your life, I cannot wait to share my sacred place with you. I can’t wait to climb half dome with you and stand at the top, holding you close, and whisper to you that this is the first place that I felt alive. Even at the age of 4 I knew it was a special place.2 more years. rootsgrowdeeper:

This life.I cannot wait to share yosemite with you, to watch you experience this for the first time in your life, I cannot wait to share my sacred place with you. I can’t wait to climb half dome with you and stand at the top, holding you close, and whisper to you that this is the first place that I felt alive. Even at the age of 4 I knew it was a special place.2 more years. 

rootsgrowdeeper:

This life.
I cannot wait to share yosemite with you, to watch you experience this for the first time in your life, I cannot wait to share my sacred place with you. 
I can’t wait to climb half dome with you and stand at the top, holding you close, and whisper to you that this is the first place that I felt alive. Even at the age of 4 I knew it was a special place.
2 more years. 

(Source: brianfulda)


“Putting them in the friendzone”? I’m sorry did you mean “I was nice to a girl and I cared about her and I’m bitter because she didn’t want me back?” Or was it “I believe that if I love another person they’re a bitch for just wanting to be friends.” Perhaps it was “I treated her (or pretended to, rather) like a person instead of a sexual object and now she’s not being a sexual object for me like I deserve.” No, wait, it’s “friendship with a girl makes me angry because I’m a self-entitled shithead who feels like if I want to be with a girl she has to accept that regardless of her feelings or else she’s a total bitch.”

The friendzone is the concept that a girl wanting to be your friend is somehow this inherently awful thing. Like, wow, did it occur to you that she thought you were, I dunno, FRIENDS? Did it occur to you that maybe she doesn’t feel romantically towards you but she still wants you to be part of her life because she thinks you’re a great person? I mean, if this is your reaction you’re wrong, because if you think friendzoning is a thing then clearly you’re a fucktrumpet but that’s beside the point.

Women are not machines you put niceness coins into until sex comes out. There are no punchcards to fill out to get to sex that you are apparently entitled to.

There is no friendzone, there are only people who don’t know how to behave like they’re not five-year-olds who don’t know how to take “no” for an answer.

— Tumblr user pinkhairedlesbianadventures (via ritualistics)


wolverxne:

How he got them to sit still, we don’t know. But somehow award-winning UK-based photographer Tim Flach managed it, and this was the result. The 54-year-old has created a collection of incredible photographic portraits of animals so intimate they reveal the complex emotions of their subjects. And the emotions on show look strikingly familiar to our own. (Full Article)
wolverxne:

How he got them to sit still, we don’t know. But somehow award-winning UK-based photographer Tim Flach managed it, and this was the result. The 54-year-old has created a collection of incredible photographic portraits of animals so intimate they reveal the complex emotions of their subjects. And the emotions on show look strikingly familiar to our own. (Full Article)
wolverxne:

How he got them to sit still, we don’t know. But somehow award-winning UK-based photographer Tim Flach managed it, and this was the result. The 54-year-old has created a collection of incredible photographic portraits of animals so intimate they reveal the complex emotions of their subjects. And the emotions on show look strikingly familiar to our own. (Full Article)
wolverxne:

How he got them to sit still, we don’t know. But somehow award-winning UK-based photographer Tim Flach managed it, and this was the result. The 54-year-old has created a collection of incredible photographic portraits of animals so intimate they reveal the complex emotions of their subjects. And the emotions on show look strikingly familiar to our own. (Full Article)
wolverxne:

How he got them to sit still, we don’t know. But somehow award-winning UK-based photographer Tim Flach managed it, and this was the result. The 54-year-old has created a collection of incredible photographic portraits of animals so intimate they reveal the complex emotions of their subjects. And the emotions on show look strikingly familiar to our own. (Full Article)
wolverxne:

How he got them to sit still, we don’t know. But somehow award-winning UK-based photographer Tim Flach managed it, and this was the result. The 54-year-old has created a collection of incredible photographic portraits of animals so intimate they reveal the complex emotions of their subjects. And the emotions on show look strikingly familiar to our own. (Full Article)
wolverxne:

How he got them to sit still, we don’t know. But somehow award-winning UK-based photographer Tim Flach managed it, and this was the result. The 54-year-old has created a collection of incredible photographic portraits of animals so intimate they reveal the complex emotions of their subjects. And the emotions on show look strikingly familiar to our own. (Full Article)
wolverxne:

How he got them to sit still, we don’t know. But somehow award-winning UK-based photographer Tim Flach managed it, and this was the result. The 54-year-old has created a collection of incredible photographic portraits of animals so intimate they reveal the complex emotions of their subjects. And the emotions on show look strikingly familiar to our own. (Full Article)

wolverxne:

How he got them to sit still, we don’t know. But somehow award-winning UK-based photographer Tim Flach managed it, and this was the result. The 54-year-old has created a collection of incredible photographic portraits of animals so intimate they reveal the complex emotions of their subjects. And the emotions on show look strikingly familiar to our own. (Full Article)


awkwardsituationist:

photos by john weller of the ross sea and its antarctic ecosystem. as weller writes,”the ross sea is special. many scientists believe it may be the most healthy open ocean ecosystem left on earth. …the ross sea is the last ocean.” 
according to the national science foundation, little if any of the ocean remains unaffected by fisheries, agricultural runoff, sewage, aquaculture and industry. we have pushed many ocean ecosystems to the brink of collapse worldwide, but the ross sea, protected by its 500 mile wide and 40 metre tall shield of ice (seventh photo), has remained largely insulated from this. 
that said, climate change is altering the balance of life in the ross sea. many colonies of emperor penguins (first photo), including the cast of “the march of penguins,” are expected to die out, unable to find suitable breeding sites as the ice disappears.
adélie penguins (fifth photo) are expected to struggle with loss of winter habitat, increased competition from more temperate penguin species, and a higher probability of summer snowstorms, which can kill a whole generation of a colony’s chicks. 
there has been also been a dramatic reduction in ecotype c orcas (seventh photo), who come to these waters to feed on an ever diminishing supply of toothfish. the rise in toothfish fisheries has meant that the population of adélie penguins, who compete with toothfish for silverfish, is growing so large as to affect other species who also rely on silverfish, like weddell seals (second and eighth photos) and antarctic minke whales (ninth photo).
 more than 500 scientists have now pooled their voices to plead with CCAMLR (the convention on the conservation of antarctic marine living resources), to stop the toothfish fishery.
antarctica holds 90% of the world’s ice, much of it ancient, and a warming planet means that over the next century, worldwide sea levels could rise by 1.5 meters. one can approximate the age of the ice by its colour (tenth photo) - the older a layer of ice gets, the denser it becomes, meaning the more wavelengths of light it absorbs, so the oldest, densest layers glow as pure blue. 
"the ross sea story is not just that of the incredible creatures that live at the edge of the world. it is our story, the story of our struggle to become sustainable," john writes. "we need to admit what is known: we have dangerously over exploited the oceans. we need to stop and protect the places we have. we need to start with the ross sea."awkwardsituationist:

photos by john weller of the ross sea and its antarctic ecosystem. as weller writes,”the ross sea is special. many scientists believe it may be the most healthy open ocean ecosystem left on earth. …the ross sea is the last ocean.” 
according to the national science foundation, little if any of the ocean remains unaffected by fisheries, agricultural runoff, sewage, aquaculture and industry. we have pushed many ocean ecosystems to the brink of collapse worldwide, but the ross sea, protected by its 500 mile wide and 40 metre tall shield of ice (seventh photo), has remained largely insulated from this. 
that said, climate change is altering the balance of life in the ross sea. many colonies of emperor penguins (first photo), including the cast of “the march of penguins,” are expected to die out, unable to find suitable breeding sites as the ice disappears.
adélie penguins (fifth photo) are expected to struggle with loss of winter habitat, increased competition from more temperate penguin species, and a higher probability of summer snowstorms, which can kill a whole generation of a colony’s chicks. 
there has been also been a dramatic reduction in ecotype c orcas (seventh photo), who come to these waters to feed on an ever diminishing supply of toothfish. the rise in toothfish fisheries has meant that the population of adélie penguins, who compete with toothfish for silverfish, is growing so large as to affect other species who also rely on silverfish, like weddell seals (second and eighth photos) and antarctic minke whales (ninth photo).
 more than 500 scientists have now pooled their voices to plead with CCAMLR (the convention on the conservation of antarctic marine living resources), to stop the toothfish fishery.
antarctica holds 90% of the world’s ice, much of it ancient, and a warming planet means that over the next century, worldwide sea levels could rise by 1.5 meters. one can approximate the age of the ice by its colour (tenth photo) - the older a layer of ice gets, the denser it becomes, meaning the more wavelengths of light it absorbs, so the oldest, densest layers glow as pure blue. 
"the ross sea story is not just that of the incredible creatures that live at the edge of the world. it is our story, the story of our struggle to become sustainable," john writes. "we need to admit what is known: we have dangerously over exploited the oceans. we need to stop and protect the places we have. we need to start with the ross sea."awkwardsituationist:

photos by john weller of the ross sea and its antarctic ecosystem. as weller writes,”the ross sea is special. many scientists believe it may be the most healthy open ocean ecosystem left on earth. …the ross sea is the last ocean.” 
according to the national science foundation, little if any of the ocean remains unaffected by fisheries, agricultural runoff, sewage, aquaculture and industry. we have pushed many ocean ecosystems to the brink of collapse worldwide, but the ross sea, protected by its 500 mile wide and 40 metre tall shield of ice (seventh photo), has remained largely insulated from this. 
that said, climate change is altering the balance of life in the ross sea. many colonies of emperor penguins (first photo), including the cast of “the march of penguins,” are expected to die out, unable to find suitable breeding sites as the ice disappears.
adélie penguins (fifth photo) are expected to struggle with loss of winter habitat, increased competition from more temperate penguin species, and a higher probability of summer snowstorms, which can kill a whole generation of a colony’s chicks. 
there has been also been a dramatic reduction in ecotype c orcas (seventh photo), who come to these waters to feed on an ever diminishing supply of toothfish. the rise in toothfish fisheries has meant that the population of adélie penguins, who compete with toothfish for silverfish, is growing so large as to affect other species who also rely on silverfish, like weddell seals (second and eighth photos) and antarctic minke whales (ninth photo).
 more than 500 scientists have now pooled their voices to plead with CCAMLR (the convention on the conservation of antarctic marine living resources), to stop the toothfish fishery.
antarctica holds 90% of the world’s ice, much of it ancient, and a warming planet means that over the next century, worldwide sea levels could rise by 1.5 meters. one can approximate the age of the ice by its colour (tenth photo) - the older a layer of ice gets, the denser it becomes, meaning the more wavelengths of light it absorbs, so the oldest, densest layers glow as pure blue. 
"the ross sea story is not just that of the incredible creatures that live at the edge of the world. it is our story, the story of our struggle to become sustainable," john writes. "we need to admit what is known: we have dangerously over exploited the oceans. we need to stop and protect the places we have. we need to start with the ross sea."awkwardsituationist:

photos by john weller of the ross sea and its antarctic ecosystem. as weller writes,”the ross sea is special. many scientists believe it may be the most healthy open ocean ecosystem left on earth. …the ross sea is the last ocean.” 
according to the national science foundation, little if any of the ocean remains unaffected by fisheries, agricultural runoff, sewage, aquaculture and industry. we have pushed many ocean ecosystems to the brink of collapse worldwide, but the ross sea, protected by its 500 mile wide and 40 metre tall shield of ice (seventh photo), has remained largely insulated from this. 
that said, climate change is altering the balance of life in the ross sea. many colonies of emperor penguins (first photo), including the cast of “the march of penguins,” are expected to die out, unable to find suitable breeding sites as the ice disappears.
adélie penguins (fifth photo) are expected to struggle with loss of winter habitat, increased competition from more temperate penguin species, and a higher probability of summer snowstorms, which can kill a whole generation of a colony’s chicks. 
there has been also been a dramatic reduction in ecotype c orcas (seventh photo), who come to these waters to feed on an ever diminishing supply of toothfish. the rise in toothfish fisheries has meant that the population of adélie penguins, who compete with toothfish for silverfish, is growing so large as to affect other species who also rely on silverfish, like weddell seals (second and eighth photos) and antarctic minke whales (ninth photo).
 more than 500 scientists have now pooled their voices to plead with CCAMLR (the convention on the conservation of antarctic marine living resources), to stop the toothfish fishery.
antarctica holds 90% of the world’s ice, much of it ancient, and a warming planet means that over the next century, worldwide sea levels could rise by 1.5 meters. one can approximate the age of the ice by its colour (tenth photo) - the older a layer of ice gets, the denser it becomes, meaning the more wavelengths of light it absorbs, so the oldest, densest layers glow as pure blue. 
"the ross sea story is not just that of the incredible creatures that live at the edge of the world. it is our story, the story of our struggle to become sustainable," john writes. "we need to admit what is known: we have dangerously over exploited the oceans. we need to stop and protect the places we have. we need to start with the ross sea."awkwardsituationist:

photos by john weller of the ross sea and its antarctic ecosystem. as weller writes,”the ross sea is special. many scientists believe it may be the most healthy open ocean ecosystem left on earth. …the ross sea is the last ocean.” 
according to the national science foundation, little if any of the ocean remains unaffected by fisheries, agricultural runoff, sewage, aquaculture and industry. we have pushed many ocean ecosystems to the brink of collapse worldwide, but the ross sea, protected by its 500 mile wide and 40 metre tall shield of ice (seventh photo), has remained largely insulated from this. 
that said, climate change is altering the balance of life in the ross sea. many colonies of emperor penguins (first photo), including the cast of “the march of penguins,” are expected to die out, unable to find suitable breeding sites as the ice disappears.
adélie penguins (fifth photo) are expected to struggle with loss of winter habitat, increased competition from more temperate penguin species, and a higher probability of summer snowstorms, which can kill a whole generation of a colony’s chicks. 
there has been also been a dramatic reduction in ecotype c orcas (seventh photo), who come to these waters to feed on an ever diminishing supply of toothfish. the rise in toothfish fisheries has meant that the population of adélie penguins, who compete with toothfish for silverfish, is growing so large as to affect other species who also rely on silverfish, like weddell seals (second and eighth photos) and antarctic minke whales (ninth photo).
 more than 500 scientists have now pooled their voices to plead with CCAMLR (the convention on the conservation of antarctic marine living resources), to stop the toothfish fishery.
antarctica holds 90% of the world’s ice, much of it ancient, and a warming planet means that over the next century, worldwide sea levels could rise by 1.5 meters. one can approximate the age of the ice by its colour (tenth photo) - the older a layer of ice gets, the denser it becomes, meaning the more wavelengths of light it absorbs, so the oldest, densest layers glow as pure blue. 
"the ross sea story is not just that of the incredible creatures that live at the edge of the world. it is our story, the story of our struggle to become sustainable," john writes. "we need to admit what is known: we have dangerously over exploited the oceans. we need to stop and protect the places we have. we need to start with the ross sea."awkwardsituationist:

photos by john weller of the ross sea and its antarctic ecosystem. as weller writes,”the ross sea is special. many scientists believe it may be the most healthy open ocean ecosystem left on earth. …the ross sea is the last ocean.” 
according to the national science foundation, little if any of the ocean remains unaffected by fisheries, agricultural runoff, sewage, aquaculture and industry. we have pushed many ocean ecosystems to the brink of collapse worldwide, but the ross sea, protected by its 500 mile wide and 40 metre tall shield of ice (seventh photo), has remained largely insulated from this. 
that said, climate change is altering the balance of life in the ross sea. many colonies of emperor penguins (first photo), including the cast of “the march of penguins,” are expected to die out, unable to find suitable breeding sites as the ice disappears.
adélie penguins (fifth photo) are expected to struggle with loss of winter habitat, increased competition from more temperate penguin species, and a higher probability of summer snowstorms, which can kill a whole generation of a colony’s chicks. 
there has been also been a dramatic reduction in ecotype c orcas (seventh photo), who come to these waters to feed on an ever diminishing supply of toothfish. the rise in toothfish fisheries has meant that the population of adélie penguins, who compete with toothfish for silverfish, is growing so large as to affect other species who also rely on silverfish, like weddell seals (second and eighth photos) and antarctic minke whales (ninth photo).
 more than 500 scientists have now pooled their voices to plead with CCAMLR (the convention on the conservation of antarctic marine living resources), to stop the toothfish fishery.
antarctica holds 90% of the world’s ice, much of it ancient, and a warming planet means that over the next century, worldwide sea levels could rise by 1.5 meters. one can approximate the age of the ice by its colour (tenth photo) - the older a layer of ice gets, the denser it becomes, meaning the more wavelengths of light it absorbs, so the oldest, densest layers glow as pure blue. 
"the ross sea story is not just that of the incredible creatures that live at the edge of the world. it is our story, the story of our struggle to become sustainable," john writes. "we need to admit what is known: we have dangerously over exploited the oceans. we need to stop and protect the places we have. we need to start with the ross sea."awkwardsituationist:

photos by john weller of the ross sea and its antarctic ecosystem. as weller writes,”the ross sea is special. many scientists believe it may be the most healthy open ocean ecosystem left on earth. …the ross sea is the last ocean.” 
according to the national science foundation, little if any of the ocean remains unaffected by fisheries, agricultural runoff, sewage, aquaculture and industry. we have pushed many ocean ecosystems to the brink of collapse worldwide, but the ross sea, protected by its 500 mile wide and 40 metre tall shield of ice (seventh photo), has remained largely insulated from this. 
that said, climate change is altering the balance of life in the ross sea. many colonies of emperor penguins (first photo), including the cast of “the march of penguins,” are expected to die out, unable to find suitable breeding sites as the ice disappears.
adélie penguins (fifth photo) are expected to struggle with loss of winter habitat, increased competition from more temperate penguin species, and a higher probability of summer snowstorms, which can kill a whole generation of a colony’s chicks. 
there has been also been a dramatic reduction in ecotype c orcas (seventh photo), who come to these waters to feed on an ever diminishing supply of toothfish. the rise in toothfish fisheries has meant that the population of adélie penguins, who compete with toothfish for silverfish, is growing so large as to affect other species who also rely on silverfish, like weddell seals (second and eighth photos) and antarctic minke whales (ninth photo).
 more than 500 scientists have now pooled their voices to plead with CCAMLR (the convention on the conservation of antarctic marine living resources), to stop the toothfish fishery.
antarctica holds 90% of the world’s ice, much of it ancient, and a warming planet means that over the next century, worldwide sea levels could rise by 1.5 meters. one can approximate the age of the ice by its colour (tenth photo) - the older a layer of ice gets, the denser it becomes, meaning the more wavelengths of light it absorbs, so the oldest, densest layers glow as pure blue. 
"the ross sea story is not just that of the incredible creatures that live at the edge of the world. it is our story, the story of our struggle to become sustainable," john writes. "we need to admit what is known: we have dangerously over exploited the oceans. we need to stop and protect the places we have. we need to start with the ross sea."awkwardsituationist:

photos by john weller of the ross sea and its antarctic ecosystem. as weller writes,”the ross sea is special. many scientists believe it may be the most healthy open ocean ecosystem left on earth. …the ross sea is the last ocean.” 
according to the national science foundation, little if any of the ocean remains unaffected by fisheries, agricultural runoff, sewage, aquaculture and industry. we have pushed many ocean ecosystems to the brink of collapse worldwide, but the ross sea, protected by its 500 mile wide and 40 metre tall shield of ice (seventh photo), has remained largely insulated from this. 
that said, climate change is altering the balance of life in the ross sea. many colonies of emperor penguins (first photo), including the cast of “the march of penguins,” are expected to die out, unable to find suitable breeding sites as the ice disappears.
adélie penguins (fifth photo) are expected to struggle with loss of winter habitat, increased competition from more temperate penguin species, and a higher probability of summer snowstorms, which can kill a whole generation of a colony’s chicks. 
there has been also been a dramatic reduction in ecotype c orcas (seventh photo), who come to these waters to feed on an ever diminishing supply of toothfish. the rise in toothfish fisheries has meant that the population of adélie penguins, who compete with toothfish for silverfish, is growing so large as to affect other species who also rely on silverfish, like weddell seals (second and eighth photos) and antarctic minke whales (ninth photo).
 more than 500 scientists have now pooled their voices to plead with CCAMLR (the convention on the conservation of antarctic marine living resources), to stop the toothfish fishery.
antarctica holds 90% of the world’s ice, much of it ancient, and a warming planet means that over the next century, worldwide sea levels could rise by 1.5 meters. one can approximate the age of the ice by its colour (tenth photo) - the older a layer of ice gets, the denser it becomes, meaning the more wavelengths of light it absorbs, so the oldest, densest layers glow as pure blue. 
"the ross sea story is not just that of the incredible creatures that live at the edge of the world. it is our story, the story of our struggle to become sustainable," john writes. "we need to admit what is known: we have dangerously over exploited the oceans. we need to stop and protect the places we have. we need to start with the ross sea."awkwardsituationist:

photos by john weller of the ross sea and its antarctic ecosystem. as weller writes,”the ross sea is special. many scientists believe it may be the most healthy open ocean ecosystem left on earth. …the ross sea is the last ocean.” 
according to the national science foundation, little if any of the ocean remains unaffected by fisheries, agricultural runoff, sewage, aquaculture and industry. we have pushed many ocean ecosystems to the brink of collapse worldwide, but the ross sea, protected by its 500 mile wide and 40 metre tall shield of ice (seventh photo), has remained largely insulated from this. 
that said, climate change is altering the balance of life in the ross sea. many colonies of emperor penguins (first photo), including the cast of “the march of penguins,” are expected to die out, unable to find suitable breeding sites as the ice disappears.
adélie penguins (fifth photo) are expected to struggle with loss of winter habitat, increased competition from more temperate penguin species, and a higher probability of summer snowstorms, which can kill a whole generation of a colony’s chicks. 
there has been also been a dramatic reduction in ecotype c orcas (seventh photo), who come to these waters to feed on an ever diminishing supply of toothfish. the rise in toothfish fisheries has meant that the population of adélie penguins, who compete with toothfish for silverfish, is growing so large as to affect other species who also rely on silverfish, like weddell seals (second and eighth photos) and antarctic minke whales (ninth photo).
 more than 500 scientists have now pooled their voices to plead with CCAMLR (the convention on the conservation of antarctic marine living resources), to stop the toothfish fishery.
antarctica holds 90% of the world’s ice, much of it ancient, and a warming planet means that over the next century, worldwide sea levels could rise by 1.5 meters. one can approximate the age of the ice by its colour (tenth photo) - the older a layer of ice gets, the denser it becomes, meaning the more wavelengths of light it absorbs, so the oldest, densest layers glow as pure blue. 
"the ross sea story is not just that of the incredible creatures that live at the edge of the world. it is our story, the story of our struggle to become sustainable," john writes. "we need to admit what is known: we have dangerously over exploited the oceans. we need to stop and protect the places we have. we need to start with the ross sea."awkwardsituationist:

photos by john weller of the ross sea and its antarctic ecosystem. as weller writes,”the ross sea is special. many scientists believe it may be the most healthy open ocean ecosystem left on earth. …the ross sea is the last ocean.” 
according to the national science foundation, little if any of the ocean remains unaffected by fisheries, agricultural runoff, sewage, aquaculture and industry. we have pushed many ocean ecosystems to the brink of collapse worldwide, but the ross sea, protected by its 500 mile wide and 40 metre tall shield of ice (seventh photo), has remained largely insulated from this. 
that said, climate change is altering the balance of life in the ross sea. many colonies of emperor penguins (first photo), including the cast of “the march of penguins,” are expected to die out, unable to find suitable breeding sites as the ice disappears.
adélie penguins (fifth photo) are expected to struggle with loss of winter habitat, increased competition from more temperate penguin species, and a higher probability of summer snowstorms, which can kill a whole generation of a colony’s chicks. 
there has been also been a dramatic reduction in ecotype c orcas (seventh photo), who come to these waters to feed on an ever diminishing supply of toothfish. the rise in toothfish fisheries has meant that the population of adélie penguins, who compete with toothfish for silverfish, is growing so large as to affect other species who also rely on silverfish, like weddell seals (second and eighth photos) and antarctic minke whales (ninth photo).
 more than 500 scientists have now pooled their voices to plead with CCAMLR (the convention on the conservation of antarctic marine living resources), to stop the toothfish fishery.
antarctica holds 90% of the world’s ice, much of it ancient, and a warming planet means that over the next century, worldwide sea levels could rise by 1.5 meters. one can approximate the age of the ice by its colour (tenth photo) - the older a layer of ice gets, the denser it becomes, meaning the more wavelengths of light it absorbs, so the oldest, densest layers glow as pure blue. 
"the ross sea story is not just that of the incredible creatures that live at the edge of the world. it is our story, the story of our struggle to become sustainable," john writes. "we need to admit what is known: we have dangerously over exploited the oceans. we need to stop and protect the places we have. we need to start with the ross sea."

awkwardsituationist:

photos by john weller of the ross sea and its antarctic ecosystem. as weller writes,”the ross sea is special. many scientists believe it may be the most healthy open ocean ecosystem left on earth. …the ross sea is the last ocean.”

according to the national science foundation, little if any of the ocean remains unaffected by fisheries, agricultural runoff, sewage, aquaculture and industry. we have pushed many ocean ecosystems to the brink of collapse worldwide, but the ross sea, protected by its 500 mile wide and 40 metre tall shield of ice (seventh photo), has remained largely insulated from this.

that said, climate change is altering the balance of life in the ross sea. many colonies of emperor penguins (first photo), including the cast of “the march of penguins,” are expected to die out, unable to find suitable breeding sites as the ice disappears.

adélie penguins (fifth photo) are expected to struggle with loss of winter habitat, increased competition from more temperate penguin species, and a higher probability of summer snowstorms, which can kill a whole generation of a colony’s chicks.

there has been also been a dramatic reduction in ecotype c orcas (seventh photo), who come to these waters to feed on an ever diminishing supply of toothfish. the rise in toothfish fisheries has meant that the population of adélie penguins, who compete with toothfish for silverfish, is growing so large as to affect other species who also rely on silverfish, like weddell seals (second and eighth photos) and antarctic minke whales (ninth photo).

more than 500 scientists have now pooled their voices to plead with CCAMLR (the convention on the conservation of antarctic marine living resources), to stop the toothfish fishery.

antarctica holds 90% of the world’s ice, much of it ancient, and a warming planet means that over the next century, worldwide sea levels could rise by 1.5 meters. one can approximate the age of the ice by its colour (tenth photo) - the older a layer of ice gets, the denser it becomes, meaning the more wavelengths of light it absorbs, so the oldest, densest layers glow as pure blue.

"the ross sea story is not just that of the incredible creatures that live at the edge of the world. it is our story, the story of our struggle to become sustainable," john writes. "we need to admit what is known: we have dangerously over exploited the oceans. we need to stop and protect the places we have. we need to start with the ross sea."